A/Prof. Bernd ROHRMANN      Dept of Psychology, University of Melbourne 
512-706 
HAZARDS/SAFETY/HEALTH: Environmental and Organizational Issues
O v e r v i e w  &  p r o g r a m 

Note:
This course was on hold. An updated course for 2007 is in preparation. 
Below is the course description from 2003.

Access:
     Graduate students, I/O Psychology Doctorate

Time & place of classes:
    Sem. 2, Thursday 14:15-16:00; room R.B.B.

Aim of the unit:
     To apply perspectives from environmental and organizational psychology to issues of the
perception, evaluation & management of hazards safety and health, and to discuss both
conceptualization and utilization of pertinent applied research.

Detailed program:
[O] [A]  Introduction and overview of the unit. - Clarification of core concepts.
[B]        Risk cognition I: Psychometric approaches to risk perception and evaluation.
[C]        Risk cognition II: Judgmental processes and cognitive biases in hazard appraisals.
[D]        Environmental stress I: Hazards for health & well-being (in occup. & private settings).
[E]        Environmental stress II: Impacts of noise & vibration.
                Guest: R. Dineen [LaTrobe Univ]: "Noise in construction work".
[F]        Accidents & safety I: Types of mistakes & errors; models of accident causation.
[G]       Accidents & safety II: Enhancing safety behavior.
[I]             Guest: A. Hagen [WorkCover]: "Organizational tasks".
[H]       Hazard evaluation I: Determinants of personal and societal risk acceptance.
[I]         Hazard evaluation II: Multi-attribute modelling.
                Demonstration of computer programs "Treeval" and "Hiview".
[J]        Risk communication I: Influencing health behavior through hazard information.
[K]       Risk communication II: Community-based risk management.
                Guest: A. Rhodes [CountryFireAuthority]: "The Community Fireguard program".
[L] [Z]  Evaluating and applying research findings. - Review and evaluation of this unit.

Literature:
     A comprehensive list of references will be distributed in session 1, selected material every week.

Assessment:
     Required contributions of participants include weekly written homework and one short essay to be presented in class (no full text but a 1-page summary/handout is to be provided). Satisfactory class participation is also requested. The assessment will be based on the written work (up to 2000 words).

Consultation:
     Thursday 15-16:00, Room 803 R.B.B.  For other times please e-mail  mail {at} rohrmannresearch.net


 

BR 03-05-07